Author Topic: Insert jig  (Read 44726 times)

Offline M. Wells

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Re: Insert jig
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2014, 09:49:52 PM »
Well this is my  :2: worth pay attention an take notes an study this forum these guys know their stuff an will teach you so much about call making!!! They are very helpful an dont mind sharing at all. The main thing is when you take that first nasty greenhead from a call you made its pays you 2 fold for the pain an sweat you put into it.
Also my way of sayin thanks guys  :beer:
Making Game Calls is a spiritual thing !!

Offline VECtor Calls

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Re: Insert jig
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2015, 02:11:33 PM »
Bump
Pass on the tradition. A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.

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Offline Joe Short

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Re: Insert jig
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2015, 12:18:21 AM »
Find your favorite 3 or 4 toneboards and draw a rough amalgam of these on a dense block of domestic hardwood with a hole in it. I've made several from hard maple and still use my favorite of them as my primary upslope jig, I've cut nearly 200 toneboards from that ugly bastage... If you have a decent source of a wood that will hold up to the abuse, I recommend starting straight away by cutting an approximate jig out and modifying each successive one, after working several toneboards, rather than free handing.
"We have a lot of great call makers in NC. Maybe more call makers than ducks." - JCZ

Offline COsby

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Re: Insert jig
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2015, 08:05:29 AM »
I started with a public jig and though I learned a lot, i feel in the long run it was a set back. After talking to one of the call wizards, I went with a flat jig from wade. That was a total game changer. I'm a million times happier with what I'm producing.
The biggest issues with a flat jig is consistency. You file for hours and try to get each one exactly the same. It's very tough.
I took the call I feel gives me the sound I want and traced it along the inside of the jig. That way I can sand for a while and put it back in to see where I need to sand more.