Author Topic: Inlays  (Read 828 times)

Offline A. Giblin

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Inlays
« on: January 08, 2018, 01:38:41 AM »
Hey all. New member here. Got a lathe from my wife for Christmas and have been turning random things to get practice while researching. I'm starting my duck calls this week after I ordered some parts for my lathe.

I am curious how you do the metal inlays on the calls or blanks in general. I've done some reading on here and other places and it's still not making full sense. My biggest issue at this point is how you glue in the metal to the blank? I've heard some say use thick CA but that's about it. Suggestions?

Also, my daughter's are big into Harry potter so I'm going to turn them wands since they just finished the 2nd book. Is it possible to use the metal from soda cans for inlays? I saw someone mention it somewhere. Might sounds cheap and cheesy but they will be toys. Obviously, I would sand both sides of the metal to rough it up. Thoughts on this?

Sorry if I posted in the wrong area. Thanks in advance!

Offline James Strickland

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Re: Inlays
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 10:14:08 AM »
Welcome to the forum!

Metal inlays on a call aren't all too difficult.  And, yes, soda can aluminum can be used for inlays.  It will be a thin inlay but that's ok.  It only affects the look of the call, not the function.

You're going to want to use something other than CA for inlays.  I always use 2 part epoxy. 

Also, you're going to want to use a tenon for metal inlays to provide added strength.  Think of it like putting a washer on a bolt.  Drill your blank for the duck call (normal bore is 5/8").  Then drill out a piece of metal at a larger bore (I usually drill at 3/4").  Then turn your blank down to 3/4" at the point where you want the inlay to be.  This is the "bolt" in my analogy.  The inlay is then the "washer" and should slide onto the tenon of your blank.  You'll need to turn an additional piece of wood to fit over the tenon and snug up to the inlay.  Think of that as the "nut" on a bolt.  You'll glue all three pieces together with 2 part epoxy and clamp tightly. 

That's a quick and general description.  Let me know if something's not clear.  Good luck!

Offline FDR

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Re: Inlays
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2018, 10:22:09 AM »
For the inlays think "bolt and washer". You turn the call barrel (tenon) to accept the washer, stack the inlays (washers) and then cap the assembly.

I use epoxy to glue the assembly together. Clean the metal well! I sand both sides then clean with denatured alcohol or acetone. I use the slower drying epoxy and clamp the assembly, allow to dry overnight and then turn.

Welcome to the THO forums!


Fred
Fred Roe
Reelfoot, the original duck call. What's on your lanyard?

Offline A. Giblin

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Re: Inlays
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2018, 12:51:29 PM »
Thank you both! It makes complete sense. I actually found a video that describes what you are explaining. I'll be turning wands today for the kids so I will test it out! Thanks again!!!