Author Topic: my thoughts on stabilizing calls  (Read 1207 times)

Offline Ozark Wood

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my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« on: April 02, 2016, 11:37:38 AM »
For a variety of reasons, life has kept me away from my lathe for over eight months and I ain't happy about that.  :mad: But, I'll be getting back soon and with some new ideas. I have done a lot of stabilizing but mostly for pens. My new venture will include stabilizing my calls. But, unlike what I see here, it seems most guys stable before turning. I think that is a backassward approach for a couple reasons. One, it wastes solution and, two, it may not penetrate completely on a large blank. I plant to turn then stable. If necessary it will go back on the lathe for polishing.
I see a lot of references to Cactus Juice and other commercial stable solutions. I make my own, which I think is better, for about 25% the cost of the commercial stuff. I'm not saying what my secret stuff is but anyone can research and create their own.
And, finally, I see setups using an acrylic lid on the vacuum pot. Puzzling. :huh: Most, or all, stable solutions contain a lot of solvent and that will lead to eventual failure of the lid. I can't see my stabilizing at work but instead go outside and watch grass grow for excitement. ::) Each to his own. Just do it. :up1:

Online FDR

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2016, 03:13:03 PM »
This post reveals that you have a lot to learn. I tried stabilizing after turning and found a lot of problems. Some include the distortion of the blank when subjected to the heat that is required to cure the resin. Another was the buildup (leaching) of resin onto the turning exterior/interior surfaces as the blank is cured. Nothing goes back on the lathe and runs true after stabilizing and nothing fits together as it did before stabilizing.  Those are some of the reasons that we stabilize first then turn. There are a lot more.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2016, 07:00:08 PM by FDR »
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Offline Mann Lock @ Hollow Wing Calls

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2016, 04:49:00 PM »
This post reveals that you have a lot to learn. I tried stabilizing after turning and found a lot of problems. Some include the distortion of the blank when subjected to the heat that is required to cure the resin. Another was the buildup (leaching) of resin onto the turning exterior/interior surfaces as the blank is cured. Nothing goes back on the lathe and runs true after stabilizing and nothing fits together as it did before stabilizing.  Those are some of the reasons that we stabilize first then turn. There are a lot more.

^^ This ^^

Offline Ozark Wood

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2017, 01:10:17 PM »
This post reveals that you have a lot to learn. I tried stabilizing after turning and found a lot of problems. Some include the distortion of the blank when subjected to the heat that is required to cure the resin. Another was the buildup (leaching) of resin onto the turning exterior/interior surfaces as the blank is cured. Nothing goes back on the lathe and runs true after stabilizing and nothing fits together as it did before stabilizing.  Those are some of the reasons that we stabilize first then turn. There are a lot more.

I learned a long time ago to avoid "resin" solutions. Heat to cure? I don't/won't do that. Sorry you have so many problems. I don't. Peace, Bro.

Offline Michael @ RK Custom Calls

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2017, 11:55:48 AM »
This post reveals that you have a lot to learn. I tried stabilizing after turning and found a lot of problems. Some include the distortion of the blank when subjected to the heat that is required to cure the resin. Another was the buildup (leaching) of resin onto the turning exterior/interior surfaces as the blank is cured. Nothing goes back on the lathe and runs true after stabilizing and nothing fits together as it did before stabilizing.  Those are some of the reasons that we stabilize first then turn. There are a lot more.

I learned a long time ago to avoid "resin" solutions. Heat to cure? I don't/won't do that. Sorry you have so many problems. I don't. Peace, Bro.

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Offline Ozark Wood

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2017, 12:27:24 PM »
This post reveals that you have a lot to learn. I tried stabilizing after turning and found a lot of problems. Some include the distortion of the blank when subjected to the heat that is required to cure the resin. Another was the buildup (leaching) of resin onto the turning exterior/interior surfaces as the blank is cured. Nothing goes back on the lathe and runs true after stabilizing and nothing fits together as it did before stabilizing.  Those are some of the reasons that we stabilize first then turn. There are a lot more.

I learned a long time ago to avoid "resin" solutions. Heat to cure? I don't/won't do that. Sorry you have so many problems. I don't. Peace, Bro.

Who pissed in this guys Cheerios...

Interesting reply.
I tried to share my experiences to help and get called ignorant and the one with an attitude.

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2017, 12:46:42 PM »
I don't see where any one called you ignorant.

I do see where you make a bunch of claims, but don't provide any proof or share any necessary details of your method that validates any of your claims. What evidence is there to make me believe in your experiences. I'd like to learn more about your method, as it appears to be quite different than most of the commercially available products that a lot of folks are using.

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Offline Tom Hamilton

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2017, 02:42:45 PM »
Hi Ozark Wood - I stabilize wood blanks for calls and pens and am interested in what you use.  I find it really interesting that you don't have to cook your blanks after you pull them from the stabilizing fluid.  I figure you must just need to let them dry instead.  I do wonder a couple things;
1 - How long do they take to dry?
2 - After stabilizing do your blanks sink or float?
3 - Have you tried stabilized and not stabilized using your system and found any tonal differences of the call output?
4 - Do your stabilized blanks need finish, or are they "good to go" after turning and sanding?
5 - If you do finish them what finish do you use?

Thanks for your help.

Happy turning - Tom
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Offline Ozark Wood

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2017, 01:19:35 PM »
Hi Ozark Wood - I stabilize wood blanks for calls and pens and am interested in what you use.  I find it really interesting that you don't have to cook your blanks after you pull them from the stabilizing fluid.  I figure you must just need to let them dry instead.  I do wonder a couple things;
1 - How long do they take to dry?
2 - After stabilizing do your blanks sink or float?
3 - Have you tried stabilized and not stabilized using your system and found any tonal differences of the call output?
4 - Do your stabilized blanks need finish, or are they "good to go" after turning and sanding?
5 - If you do finish them what finish do you use?

Thanks for your help.

Happy turning - Tom

1] In nice weather I just put them outside for an hour or two.
2] Never tested. Good question, I'll test and report later.
3] There is a difference, improvement, IMHO.
4] No finish needed but fine sanding needed. I use Micro Mesh but other stuff will work.
5] Depending on my attitude of the day, I might leave alone or put on a high quality caranuba wax.
Thanks for asking. And, BTW, yes, I guess I'm being selfish not sharing my formula for now. My plan is to keep it secret and capture the world market. :whistling:

Offline Al_at_THO Game Calls

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2017, 10:51:04 AM »
Quote
Thanks for asking. And, BTW, yes, I guess I'm being selfish not sharing my formula for now. My plan is to keep it secret and capture the world market.  :whistling: 

And while I have never had an issue with people keeping secrets, I do have an issue with people flaunting it in the forum.  If you want to share, then please do.  If you do not want to share, then it is probably best to just keep quiet about things.

It's just my opinion, but then, well....it is my forum.

Thanks

Al @ THO

Offline rodney gillikin

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2017, 08:33:30 AM »
just a thought I work with composite for aircraft and we use epoxy's resins for repairs , we also mix acetone to thin in down to a water like , I think the same can be done draw a vacuum with this thinned down resin and then after the acetone flashes off then it get hard with out oven heat I have tried yet but I will someday . but this is interesting and this is only a thought not a proven process. but if someone try's in out please share . 
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Offline Tom Hamilton

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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2017, 11:39:45 AM »
Ozark Woods - Thanks for the reply.  Let me know when you plan to start your sales, I'm interested in trying some.

Happy Turning - Tom
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Re: my thoughts on stabilizing calls
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2017, 04:39:21 PM »
just a thought I work with composite for aircraft and we use epoxy's resins for repairs , we also mix acetone to thin in down to a water like , I think the same can be done draw a vacuum with this thinned down resin and then after the acetone flashes off then it get hard with out oven heat I have tried yet but I will someday . but this is interesting and this is only a thought not a proven process. but if someone try's in out please share .


You basically described the Massey Finish. Most guys use it as a top coat finish to the outside of their calls. But interesting idea to try it under vacuum. It would have to be pretty thin to get it penetrate very far.

Brian 

You won't get money rich in this hobby.  The richness is in the culture, the craft, the friends you meet along the way, and being able to call in a wary game animal with a call that you made with your own hands.