Author Topic: Carbide Tool Tutorial  (Read 3779 times)

Offline Joe Short

  • Tutorial Contributor
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 651
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Beulaville, NC
Carbide Tool Tutorial
« on: March 16, 2015, 04:53:16 PM »
Like many of you, I began making calls for personal satisfaction, not the almighty dollar. As such, spending obscene sums of money on "specialized" tooling doesn't happen all that often (read, ever) in my shop. Rather, I choose to build or make that which I can and attempt to make do without that which I cannot. Many shopmade tools and jigs have helped me along this call making journey and continue to do so. I hope this helps some of you, in some small way, to embrace that side of call making that really puts the making first. I'll attempt to be as concise as possible. If you find that I've overlooked something you would like to know more about, feel free to make it known and I will address it. The more you make, the more you'll save. Ultimately, for 5 tools you should come in under $8 each (depending on the tools you already have on hand).
Here's how I make them:
I start by cutting a piece of 1/2" square (for this example, though 3/8" and/or round works as well) cold-rolled steel stock (about $9 for 4ft at TSC, slightly more on Amazon) to my preferred length, approximately 9.5" for this one, with a hacksaw or angle grinder.

Cut to length:

Now I use a cheap center drill to make a 60 chamber in the end of the steel stock so that my tailstock can engage without damaging the tip:

At this point I will clamp the steel securely in my bench vise and, with a file or angle grinder (much faster), knock down the corners of the portion of the bar I intend to mount in a handle. 3.5" in this case. Unfortunately I neglected to photograph this step, mostly because I skipped it... you'll see that it's safer, though, to do it this way in the coming photos. Of note: this step is not strictly critical, as you could simply use the pythagorean theorem (or calipers) to determine the size of bit needed to ensure that the handle will accept the steel in its square, unaltered form; here's that calculation for a 1/2" bar: .52+.52=C2 | C=√.5... ~.707 or slightly over 11/16" which would be a great size for a press fit, 18mm would be a nearly perfect fit.
Next I chuck that steel bar up in my 4-jaw and engage the tailstock with a 60 live center. Now I'll use an angle grinder to completely round out the portion of the bar to be seated in the handle (I go with 31/64" for 1/2" bars) and cut grooves to aid in mechanical hold once I have epoxied it into the blank... obviously this is not the safest procedure and I do not recommend that you try anything you feel uncomfortable with, nor do I take any responsibility for your safety or lack thereof. I use this method because, for me, it's not worth the cost of an additional specialty drill bit size that I would never have a different use for.

Once complete, it should look like this:

Now would be a good time to sand and polish the steel to make it nice and shiny, if you're into that sort of thing (I am). At this point I'll drill out a blank and epoxy the shaft into it. Once the epoxy has cured, I rechuck the square steel in my 4-jaw and engage the live center of my tailstock on the wood blank. Now turn the handle to shape, this shouldn't require a picture. I like to leave a tenon for a brass ferrule that I will make from a piece of tubing I got from someplace awhile back at a great price (should be in the $5-10 range online). Here's finishing that ferrule up:

Next, it's seat the ferrule and get on with preparing the tool to hold cutters. I use an angle grinder for the bulk of the material and a file to flatten it out and dial it in to the dimensions I want based on the cutter I intend to use:

Once this is completed, I use that specific cutter head to mark out where I will drill and tap the tool:

Drill and tap the stock. This last step is fully dependent upon the diameter of the hole in the specific cutter you wish to use. I use 15 and 16mm square and radius, 14-16mm round, and the cheapest diamond shape I could find... all take an 8-32 screw. I believe these are substantially larger than the EWT cutter sizes and hole diameters but I've never bought one and so cannot compare. Just remember to tap wisely so as not to break your tap and you'll have yourself a brand new tool:


I hope this has been useful.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2015, 07:53:15 PM by Joe Short »
"We have a lot of great call makers in NC. Maybe more call makers than ducks." - JCZ

Offline dogcatcher

  • Tutorial Contributor
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 3950
  • Location: West Texas, New Mexico or on the road
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2015, 05:01:55 PM »
Nice job!

Marvin
Combat Infantryman, the ultimate hunter where the prey shoots back.
Old style calls for today's outdoorsman
"Call and they will come."
Helping those that are helping themselves.

Offline VECtor Calls

  • Global Mentor & Moderator
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 11264
  • Location: Whitetail Country
  • VECtor Custom Calls
    • VECtor Custom Calls
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2015, 06:59:34 PM »
Very nice work Joe!  Great step by step, and you sure did the extra things to make the tool a nice part of a shop's set!
Pass on the tradition. A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.

VECtor Custom Calls
Deer Grunt Calls Turkey Calls and Other Custom Game Calls

Offline Joe Short

  • Tutorial Contributor
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 651
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Beulaville, NC
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2015, 07:15:09 PM »
Thanks, guys!
"We have a lot of great call makers in NC. Maybe more call makers than ducks." - JCZ

Offline Jeremy @ Havoc Calls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 699
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Ethel, AR
    • Havoc Calls
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2015, 07:15:57 PM »
Awesome Joe, Thanks  :bigup:
Havoc Calls - Custom Duck & Goose Calls


Offline Jeff @ Mutt Calls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 2096
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Suffolk, Virginia
  • MUTT Game Calls
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2015, 07:20:43 AM »
Well done Joe!

Jeff
For it is in the Woods, Fields, & Marshes that Retrievers make thier own legends... and become our heroes!

 muttcalls@gmail

Offline Bob from Eames Custom Calls

  • Global Mentor & Moderator
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 2134
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Dallas, OR
  • Eames Custom Calls
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2015, 11:30:24 AM »
Good write up!

 Bob
My biggest fear is that I'll die and my wife will sell my callmaking supplies for what I told her they cost.....

Offline BigB

  • THO Game Calls Forum Manager
  • Administrator
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 5682
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Decatur, Illinois
    • Byers Custom Calls THO gallery
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2015, 02:34:42 PM »

Thanks Joe for sharing!

Brian
You won't get money rich in this hobby.  The richness is in the culture, the craft, the friends you meet along the way, and being able to call in a wary game animal with a call that you made with your own hands.

 

Offline Dave @ Hagermans Custom Calls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 222
  • Location: Rolesville, NC
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2015, 09:50:46 PM »
Nice job!
2015 NWTF Southeast Call Makers Comp.   
1st. Place Other ( Deer Grunt ).                   
2nd Place Scratch box
4th  Place Trough Call
3rd. Place Push Pin

2016 Southeast Call Makers Comp.
1st Scratch and Push Pin
2nd Scratch Box
3rd Push Pin and Trough Call
4th Trough Call

Offline Joe Short

  • Tutorial Contributor
  • Custom Call Maker
  • *
  • Posts: 651
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Beulaville, NC
Re: Carbide Tool Tutorial
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2015, 09:58:08 PM »
Thank ye all blessed call makers of the holy THO!   :beer:
"We have a lot of great call makers in NC. Maybe more call makers than ducks." - JCZ