Author Topic: dust collector pipe  (Read 2152 times)

Offline Ryan@roosagamecalls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 724
  • Age: 37
  • Location: ohio
dust collector pipe
« on: December 10, 2014, 06:16:42 AM »
My old dust collector was small and a royal pain so I resently  bought a new bigger unit with the canister filter . on my old unit I just had a hose but this one I want to run pipe along my shop walls then smaller hose and my question is since I'm a plumber and have a lot of extra PVC pipe laying around should I use that and ground it so I Dont get static sparks. Any info would be appreciated.

Offline HaMeR

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 2957
  • Age: 57
  • Location: New Philadelphia, Ohio
    • brightwoodturnings
Re: dust collector pipe
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2014, 08:52:53 AM »
Yes you need to ground it. Especially where the PVC connects to the flexible hose. Strip the plastic off the flexible hose to reveal the wire inside & connect the ground to it.

http://images.meredith.com/wood/pdf/1st-page-art.pdf

http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/dust-collection/installing-a-dust-collection-system/
RIP Russ,Blaine,& Darrell!!

Glen

2014-15TBC-- 11

Offline Ryan@roosagamecalls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 724
  • Age: 37
  • Location: ohio
Re: dust collector pipe
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2014, 09:00:36 AM »
i cant get a better description than that thanks for the picks you simplified it for me i was way over thinking it thanks Hamer

Offline Joe aka COLD @ J. A. Kolter Calls

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 780
  • Age: 74
  • Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    • www.jakoltercalls.com
Re: dust collector pipe
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2014, 12:37:06 PM »
I would not use PVC its more work and more of a hazard from static electricity than metal.  4 inch galvanized sections are cheap and easier to put together with electrical tape.  For proper safety against explosion and/or fire you need to ground as follows . . .
1.  Provide main ground rod outside below frost line level to electrical shut-off directly to dust collector and to breaker main.
2.  Run solid copper inside piping using wire nuts at all junctures leaving enough lengths for reaching all main floor and bench powered tools.
3.  Wrap a stranded copper wire around all piping in a circular fashion attaching all ends to the solid wire nut connections.
4.  Connect both the stranded and solid copper wire together and securely attach to each power tool at a good grounding location.
Although this is good protection, always clean up excessive dust in the shop area.  Danger from a dust explosion is always present.  Daily clean up with a good shop vac is just makes good sense.
J. A. KOLTER CALLS
"Lifetime custom made hunting calls for a reasonable price".

Offline JCurren

  • Custom Call Maker
  • ****
  • Posts: 340
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Georgetown, TX
Re: dust collector pipe
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2014, 07:05:06 AM »
One of the best references I've seen for all things dust collector is http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm
There is a ton of information there on ducts for collectors.
"We enjoy the process far more than the proceeds."  Warren Buffett

Offline djones

  • New Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: dust collector pipe
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2017, 09:45:32 AM »
I found this guide to provide a lot of additional tips to.