Author Topic: Color Mixing  (Read 1981 times)

Offline Banded Drake Woodworks

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Color Mixing
« on: August 19, 2014, 08:23:54 PM »
Lately I've began playing a little more with acrylic pours and trying to get some different results. I'm using silmar 41 as my resin and castin craft pigments. Here's my question, the product I'm aiming for is a two color pour with one color being dominant. For example, my mold calls for about 4 oz, so I'm using 3 oz of one color and 1 of the other. What I'm hoping for is the dominant color to have just strands or waves of the other color running through it without them mixing together. I've tried pouring at different times after catalyst added and cannot seem to keep the colors from blending. Any help or even pointing me in the right direction would be appreciated.

Offline dogcatcher

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Re: Color Mixing
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2014, 09:46:50 PM »
I would check the casting forum on IAP, they have worked with the casting of Silmar 41 and Alumilite for a lot more years than callmakers.  The penturners have come close to perfection of resin blanks, no point in trying to reinvent the wheel, go to the experts and mine their information.  Don't forget to take notes, there are 16 pages of threads to read. 

http://www.penturners.org/forum/f43/

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Offline Banded Drake Woodworks

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Re: Color Mixing
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2014, 12:50:35 AM »
Thank you, I'll go check it out

Offline Chris @ Palmetto Pens & Calls

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Re: Color Mixing
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2014, 09:44:02 AM »
The biggest thing you have to learn is the time it takes to start setting up.  You will have to pour the resin right before that in order to get clean clear crisp lines of separation.   That time can vary depending on a number of variables such as how much catalyst you put in, what the temperature is outside,even different colors set up faster than others.  The best way to get it right is just Prarie and take notes of what you do.